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Feb 11-20th, 2000 Daily Reports

For Latest News. For earlier reports: See the Site Index for a list of all the Daily Reports plus many other stories. If you are new to the site you will want to visit the Site Index... along with the homepage... Please visit Everest News Sponsor page !

Daily News: 2/19/2000 Report

  • Russell Brice returns to Everest:

Russell will again be on the North Side of Everest in Spring 2000. However, for 2000 he has returned to using western guides. At least three, EverestNews.com has learned: Chris Warner, Andy Lapkas, and Mark Whetu, plus around 7 other clients.

EverestNews.com assumes Brice will continue to use Asian-Trekking for his support and H.A. Sherpa climbers along with the western guides.

In 1999, Brice did not use any western guides, but used Sherpas from Asian-Trekking.

EverestNews.com does not know any specifics on how these clients or others will be supported.

  • If you missed it: There are several Q&As on the Home Page listed. These include Q&A's from Graham Hoyland and Eric Simonson on the Mallory findings. Check them out ! More Soon on Mallory & Irvine 2000.

  

Daily News: 2/18/2000 Report

  • Jochen Hemmleb Interview Continues:

    EverestNews.com readers ask Jochen Hemmleb Questions on Mallory & Irvine.  For the complete Q&A to date see the home page, the link is on the left shared border with the others.

Part 6:

Q.) Now my question. Like many people, I would like to think Mallory did make it to the summit. But Odell saw them on what he said a prominent, rock step. And am i right in thinking, that you don't know whether it was the first, second or third step. Then Odell says he lost them, because of the snow squall, that brought down a layer of fresh snow, he then said he didn't see them again. Surely if they had reached the summit, he would have had another sighting of them.

A.) [Jochen] This is surely one of the biggest problems. However, if they had already been below the Second Step (without having reached the top) at the time Odell started scanning the ridge (after 4 p.m.), they could easily have been lost from sight against the numerous rocks and snow patches. Moreover, the ridge between the Second and Third Steps is curved in a way that climbers traversing back to the Second Step from the base of the Final Pyramid are hidden from view to watchers below. A permanent watch of the ridge was not kept until 7 p.m., when Odell arrived back at the North Col.

Q.) Hi Jochen, Do we know how long M&I's rope was on their last attempt? There is mention in the expedition accounts of a 200' rope used to rescue porters, etc. Do you think they took such a long rope with them on an attempt where weight was so critical?

A.) [Jochen] I doubt they did: standard climbing ropes used in the Alps at the time were about 100 ft. long.

Q.) And if they did, here's some speculation for you. Assuming that they used part of it to rappel the 2nd Step, would anything have been left of a hemp rope after 36 years of exposure - when the Chinese ascended it in 1960? And speaking of the early Chinese attempts, do we know for sure of any artifacts that they may have found that would be of interest to us today? Pete

A.) [Jochen] The Chinese did not report finding anything above the Second Step in 1960. Their own rappel rope was found tied to a boulder by the 1975 summit team. The "mystery tent" apparently found above the Yellow Band is enigmatic, and more research needs to be done on this one.

Q.) We know how the Chinese climbed the "verticle prow" of the 2nd Step in 1975-one climber used his bare feet & another stood on his shoulder to get over. The Chinese installed the metal ladder in the 2nd Step on that expedition. Do you have any idea how the Chinese surmounted the 2nd Step in their 1960 expedition?

A.) [Jochen] You mix up the two expeditions here: It was on the 1960 climb that Qu Yinhua stood on Liu Lienman's shoulders to overcome the Second Step headwall. Qu had removed his boots and socks either to gain a better grip on the rock or, more likely, to avoid hurting his partner. They also used at least three pitons to aid the pitch, climbing the wall just to the right of Anker's crack.

In 1975, the Chinese installed the ladder to avoid repeating the 1960 experience. They found the pitons left behind 15 years earlier, and on top of the Second Step came across part of the 1960 party's rappel rope, tied to a boulder. The years of exposure had faded the rope's color from red to yellow, yet it was still strong enough to withstand pulls. Just for completion of the story: Photographic evidence in the 1960 film shows that they reached at least the foot of the Third Step, 250 ft. above the top of the Second Step. Topographical details included in their first reports match the route from there to the summit, i.e. they describe the summit snowfield, the traverse around the summit tower and mistaking the first rise of the final ridge for the summit - an experience repeated by Matt Dickinson in 1996, and described in almost identical words. No direct evidence that they reached the summit, but a strong probability.

Q.) Jochen, Thanks again for all your responses. Jochen from where the position of George Mallory was found, I was wondering if you deduce where you'd think where the body Irvine may be? Do you think is to the left or to the right of Mallory? 

A.) [Jochen] Closer to the Chinese 1975 Camp VI, which means more likely to the left of Mallory's position, and also higher.

Q.) Do we know with certainty if Mallory and Irvine had available for them a stove at Camp 6 prior to their summit attempt?

A.) [Jochen] Their equipment list contains one stove and fuel. I think this is the stove they wanted to use at Camp V, and therefore the stove they wanted Odell to use & the stove that was lost. There was no stove at Camp V before their attempt, because Norton & Somervell had taken theirs to Camp VI. I doubt M & I would have continued their ascent (which they did) if they hadn't counted on Norton & Somervell's stove waiting at Camp VI. 

Q.) What was Mallory & Irvine's   food supply prior to their summit attempt? at altitude one's appetite tends to drop so that may not be a big concern but a stove and the melting of water and of hydrating does.   Thanks for your time Jochen

A.) [Jochen] Their equipment list contains raisins, prunes, biscuits, chocolate, Kendal mint cake, butter scotch and ginger nuts. Also tea, milk, macaroni, sliced ham and tongue. There is also a list written by Norton, "taken to Camp V on June 3 (sic, meaning June 2)", so some of Norton's supplies may have remained at the high camps. Another list, written by Irvine, notes other items, including 2 boxes of meat lozenges. And finally, Geoffrey Bruce sent some food up to the North Col the day prior to M & I's attempt, apparently requested by Mallory: two tins of Bully Beef, two tins of Bovril, biscuits, beef tongue, foiegras, and additional fuel for the stoves. For the stove itself, see 8.)

The Book

Ghosts of Everest; The Search for Mallory & Irvine  by Jochen Hemmleb, Eric Simonson, Larry Johnson  

Hardcover - 208 pages (October 1999)  The Mountaineers Books;  Price reduced !

The papers:

Jochen Hemmleb's Research Papers

  • Next on Mallory & Irvine: Questions from the Staff at EverestNews.com

Many of the behind the scenes questions.

For Example: Let's suppose the camera is found. Does it not belong to the family ? And is the film not copyrighted ?? Can any else publish it ?

Maybe we can go in-depth on these Questions and others.

Daily News: 2/17/2000 Report

  • Everest Spring 2000: Who is going ?

Everyone it seems someday.

We have Peter Habeler, Hans van der Meulen (famous Dutch climber who summited K2), Andrew Lock (famous Australian climber who summited K2), Juanito Oiarzabal (who has summited ALL the 14 8000 meter peaks, without question we should add), and many more famous climbers from all over the world. Some still working on sponsors.

On Expedition/Teams, we have climbers from Germany, Austria, France, Belgium. We have the Danish, Americas, Dutch (many), French Canadians, Australians, Canadians, Spanish (many), British, and the Nepali women along others.

Everest Spring 2000 is expected to be packed !

  • The Snow: EverestNews.com has received News from two sources that the Snow "up high" is believed to be "light". We will know more in April and May. Expect teams to arrive early and get going as the race for first up in 2000 starts. They also have the Irvine issue...

  • Adventure Consultants still has opening for their Everest Base Camp Trek (South Side): if you happen to have 22 days free in April there are still 5 spaces left. This a perfect opportunity to stretch your legs in the Khumbu Valley.  Dates March 29 - April 19, Price US$2500 per person ex Kathmandu. 

  

Daily News: 2/16/2000 Report

  • Graham Ratcliffe: Lhotse 2000 Expedition

"Unusually heavy snowfalls at the end of last season appear not to be clearing and will be covering much of the rubbish we were hoping to clear this spring.

After careful consideration www.highambitions.com  has decided to postpone the expedition until spring 2001, we feel it would be unwise to spend the funds we have managed to raise to date and rush in when we think we will have a much better chance of success by being patient - a good motto for most mountain situations." Graham Ratcliffe

Graham and his team was planning an environment expedition to help clean up Everest. For all the details see their web site.

  

Daily News: 2/15/2000 Report

  • Jochen Hemmleb Interview Continues:

    EverestNews.com readers ask Jochen Hemmleb Questions on Mallory & Irvine.  For the complete Q&A to date see the home page, the link is on the left shared border with the others.

Part 5:

Q.) I felt that the single most important piece of information that was discovered by the M&I Research Expedition of 1999 was the condition of George's body.  The second was where they found it.

I believe there is now sufficient information in the above two facts to reasonably place M&I as having climbed beyond 28,280 ft, thus surmounting the second Step, and making it to at least the rock band under the summit pyramid.  I also believe the evidence clearly points to M&I returning by a different route than what they took when climbing up.  I can not from what I know place them on top of Everest.

The Body:

The condition of Mallory's body would indicate that he (they) did not fall from the ridge. He was stretched out with arms and hands extended up the slope; legs extended down the slope.  This is not how an unconscious body, falling from a great height, over rocky terrain, would come to rest.  Other bodies within the fall zone of the ridge are referred to as mangled and twisted.  This doesn't represent Mallory.

So if he (they) didn't fall from the ridge, which I would estimate to be about 1,000 vertical ft. higher plus horizontal distance across rocky terraces near the top and larger snow fields towards the bottom, then he (they) fell from somewhere lower down.  And to have stopped in that stretched out position, relatively free of cuts or marks to the back testifies to some control during the fall, probably conscious until coming to rest, indicates to me that he (they) could not have fallen far.

Location and Return Route:

The 1999 M&I Research Expedition found Mallory west of the targeted search area.  So now the question becomes one of explaining why and how he (they) got from the ridge to a point lower down on the mountain face, from which he (they) fell.

I would look at the topography and what Somervell and Norton had accomplished a few days earlier to provide the clues. Mallory and Irvine simply were on a different route going down than what they took going up ... by choice.  I appears to me entirely likely that they fell from about the same traverse line that Somervell and Norton had used a few days earlier.  This would place them about 500 ft. lower than the ridge line and on less slopping terrain with fewer terraces; thus the overall good condition of the body and location at its final place of rest.

To get them down to the Somervell and Norton's traverse line, I must admit is speculation. But the location and condition of the body has to be accounted for some way.  If they were using this line of traverse coming down, when he (they) fell, it would explain such.

Two clues point me in this direction.  First, Mr. Odell searching pattern of 1924.  Where did he look for them.? Up on the ridge where he had seen them?  No!  The first time he "struck out across the mountainside" ( The Last Climb).  "He set out on the North Face of the mountain, whistling and yodeling" (First On Everest).  The next time up he clearly states that, "he searched about on the slabs to the west of Camp VI to about 28,000 ft." (The Last Climb).  "... on vast expanse of crags and broken slabs" (Odell from First On Everest).  Why west?  And to 28,000 ft. is a long ways out.  I realize that Camp VI had been moved to a higher position by M&I and the porters. (We could go into that later.) A search across the mountainside or west of this site, Camp VI's new location, to almost 28,000 ft would have had to have been along the traverse line of Somervell and Norton would it not?  But Odell had seen them on the ridge line.  Why would he not have moved up towards and onto the ridge if they were to be coming back that way?  But he went out across the mountain side, on the slabs.  Why west unless he knew something about a possible different return route?  I have not found where he was asked this question or made comment.

The second clue for them to be on the Somervell and Norton traverse line coming back has a lot to do with the sighting of them by Odell and the difficulties of the Second Step.  I don't know why Mallory favored the ridge route going up when Somervell and Norton had earlier (like wise Wager and Harris later in1933, the Chinese in 1960 and/or 1975) favored more of a traverse line.  But for whatever reason we know that they were on the ridge, (sighted by Odell at 12:50 pm and confirmed on the ridge in 1999 with the find of the 1924 oxygen bottle) but Mallory's body indicates a fall from a lessor height.  Somewhere after 12:50 pm he (they) had to abandon the ridge line in order to have fallen from a lower altitude.

So where and when?  Odell's sighting, 12:50 pm, plus the topography would indicate that they could only have dropped down to the Somervell and Norton traverse line from near the rocky bands at the base of the summit pyramid.  If something would have blocked their path once they reached the ridge, between early morning to mid day,  then a retreat back down the ridge seems in order.  To drop from the ridge just below the Second Step down to the Somervell and Norton traverse line or even to traverse towards it appears unlikely do to the topography.  But since they are still on the ridge line at 12:50 pm it would appear that the only reasonable way to place them on the traverse line of Somervell and Norton, later in the day, after 12;50 pm, and to find Mallory's body so far west, is to have them continue on to the base of the summit pyramid.  Somervell and Norton had reported it to be only about 200 ft above them at Norton's high point and not too difficult ( The Last Climb ).  They would then have had an option available to them.  Return at some time back down the ridge or drop down the Coulior, return along this known climbable route to Camp VI.  This would eliminate the need to go back down over the Second Step. The choice to drop to the lower line for return could have been made days earlier or once they got up the Second Step and realized the difficulty presented in going down it. It doesn't matter.  The Coulior is the connection from the ridge line, I think just above the Third Step, to the Somervell and Norton traverse line.  I do not see any other route that could have gotten him (them) off the ridge line, lower, and still be found that far west and in reasonably good state of condition.

Maybe some oxygen bottles and possibly their oxygen carrying packs will some day be found near the base of the summit pyramid.  They did not believe that oxygen was of any value when going down.  Is this an open area that climbers would be taking  different routes through?  Could Mallory's mind set on keeping to the ridge influence the way they would come into this area verses today's climbing route(s)?

Did they go to the top?  I don't know.  Irvine doesn't appear to have an ice ax and the rest of the way is mainly on snow and ice.  I don't know where George's ax is either.  The missing picture of Ruth Mallory, five unaccounted for oxygen bottles, two backpacks to carry them, a camera that I seriously doubt will be found on Irvine's body do to ... well, I don't want to get into that here, all on a mountain that is moving at nearly one inch per year ... the mystery will be around awhile. I would appreciate your thoughts in return.

Thank you for your time and consideration

A.) [Jochen] "I have to go over this one step-by-step: "

Q..) I felt that the single most important piece of information that was discovered by the M&I Research Expedition of 1999 was the condition of George's body.  The second was where they found it.

I believe there is now sufficient information in the above two facts to reasonably place M&I as having climbed beyond 28,280 ft, thus surmounting the second Step, and making it to at least the rock band under the summit pyramid.  I also believe the evidence clearly points to M&I returning by a different route than what they took when climbing up.  I can not from what I know place them on top of Everest.

The Body:

The condition of Mallory's body would indicate that he (they) did not fall from the ridge. He was stretched out with arms and hands extended up the slope; legs extended down the slope.  This is not how an unconscious body, falling from a great height, over rocky terrain, would come to rest.   Other bodies within the fall zone of the ridge are referred to as mangled and twisted.  This doesn't represent Mallory.

So if he (they) didn't fall from the ridge, which I would estimate to be about 1,000 vertical ft. higher plus horizontal distance across rocky terraces near the top and larger snow fields towards the bottom, then he (they) fell from somewhere lower down.  And to have stopped in that stretched out position, relatively free of cuts or marks to the back testifies to some control during the fall, probably conscious until coming to rest, indicates to me that he (they) could not have fallen far. ________________________________________________________

A.) [Jochen] "It is true that many of our search team felt that Mallory's injuries were too mild to have been caused by a fall all the way from the ridge crest. The apparent self-arrest position is something of a mystery when you consider the severe head wound discovered during the second search effort. However, a pathologist once confirmed that periods of consciousness are known from people with similar head injuries - so Mallory could have remained conscious for a time long enough to either crawl a short distance or maintain his self-arrest position."

________________________________________________________

Q.) Location and Return Route:

The 1999 M&I Research Expedition found Mallory west of the targeted search area.  So now the question becomes one of explaining why and how he (they) got from the ridge to a point lower down on the mountain face, from which he (they) fell.

I would look at the topography and what Somervell and Norton had accomplished a few days earlier to provide the clues. Mallory and Irvine simply were on a different route going down than what they took going up .... by choice.  I appears to me entirely likely that they fell from about the same traverse line that Somervell and Norton had used a few days earlier.  This would place them about 500 ft. lower than the ridge line and on less slopping terrain with fewer terraces; thus the overall good condition of the body and location at its final place of rest.

To get them down to the Somervell and Norton's traverse line, I must admit is speculation. But the location and condition of the body has to be accounted for some way.  If they were using this line of traverse coming down, when he (they) fell, it would explain such.

______________________________________________________

A.) [Jochen] "First, Mallory was NOT found west of the targeted search area. The center of the targeted search area was determined by intersection of a fall line from the place of the ice-ax and a horizontal walk from the Chinese 1975 Camp VI - that's all what could have been done with the available clues before the expedition. In the end, a body - Mallory - was found BELOW the targeted search area, at the very bottom edge of the so-called Snow Terrace. It was at the outmost radius of the general search area - had Mallory fallen a few yards farther, he would have gone off the edge of a cliff band and vanished in the void of the North Face. To have come to rest in the place where he was found, and in the condition in which he was found, Mallory must have fallen from a point BELOW the ridge crest, but not necessarily off his route of ascent. He could have fallen from the gully leading up through the Yellow Band from Camp VI, which is now the common route - although I tend to agree that he must have been farther to the west, perhaps half the horizontal distance between the gully and the First Step." ____________________________________________________

Q.) Two clues point me in this direction.  First, Mr. Odell searching pattern of 1924.  Where did he look for them.? Up on the ridge where he had seen them?  No!  The first time he "struck out across the mountainside" ( The Last Climb).  "He set out on the North Face of the mountain, whistling and yodeling" (First On Everest).   The next time up he clearly states that, "he searched about on the slabs to the west of Camp VI to about 28,000 ft." (The Last Climb).  "... on vast expanse of crags and broken slabs" (Odell from First On Everest).  Why west?   And to 28,000 ft. is a long ways out.  I realize that Camp VI had been moved to a higher position by M&I and the porters. (We could go into that later.) A search across the mountainside or west of this site, Camp VI's new location, to almost 28,000 ft would have had to have been along the traverse line of Somervell and Norton would it not?   But Odell had seen them on the ridge line.  Why would he not have moved up towards and onto the ridge if they were to be coming back that way?  But he went out across the mountain side, on the slabs.  Why west unless he knew something about a possible different return route?  I have not found where he was asked this question or made comment. ________________________________________________________

A.) [Jochen] "The suggestion that the camp was moved higher stems from Noel's book and is in all probability false. From Odell's description and from where the 1933 party found the remains, it is highly likely that the camp had remained in the same place where it had been established by Norton & Somervell. Secondly, I don't believe Odell went as high as 28.000 ft. (the foot of the First Step). Although he assumed so (only guessing, in fact) in an interview for Breashears' 1986 film about the mystery, one has to put the following points into consideration: a) Odell climbed up for about one hour. b) He did not use oxygen. c) The camp was located near the crest of the North Ridge.

From this, it appears that Odell traversed over the north-eastern part of the Snow Terrace to near the entry of the gully leading up through the Yellow Band. The time taken is consistent with that of other oxygen-less parties (Norton & Somervell, Smythe & Shipton). The "slabs west of Camp VI" (in 1924) would have meant the north-eastern part of the Snow Terrace, as you do not approach the ridge crest from anywhere nearer Camp VI than the described gully (only Longland's party descended a different way by following a ledge system all the way to the top of the North Ridge - but any party going up would try to reach the crest in a long ascending traverse from Camp VI. The main difference between Norton's traverse and the approach to the ridge crest is that the former ascends at a more shallow angle - the start of both routes is very similar.)"

Q.) The second clue for them to be on the Somervell and Norton traverse line coming back has a lot to do with the sighting of them by Odell and the difficulties of the Second Step.  I don't know why Mallory favored the ridge route going up when Somervell and Norton had earlier (like wise Wager and Harris later in1933, the Chinese in 1960 and/or 1975) favored more of a traverse line.   But for whatever reason we know that they were on the ridge, (sighted by Odell at 12:50 pm and confirmed on the ridge in 1999 with the find of the 1924 oxygen bottle) but Mallory's body indicates a fall from a lessor height.  Somewhere after 12:50 pm he (they) had to abandon the ridge line in order to have fallen from a lower altitude.

A.) [Jochen] "Wager & Wyn Harris traversed higher than Norton & Somervell, following the ridge crest to the base of the First Step and then staying along the top edge of the Yellow Band. From what we know, the Chinese stuck to the ridge crest route, either ascending or by passing the First Step before continuing to the Second Step."

Q.) So where and when?   Odell's sighting, 12:50 pm, plus the topography would indicate that they could only have dropped down to the Somervell and Norton traverse line from near the rocky bands at the base of the summit pyramid.  If something would have blocked their path once they reached the ridge, between early morning to mid day,  then a retreat back down the ridge seems in order.  To drop from the ridge just below the Second Step down to the Somervell and Norton traverse line or even to traverse towards it appears unlikely do to the topography.  But since they are still on the ridge line at 12:50 pm it would appear that the only reasonable way to place them on the traverse line of Somervell and Norton, later in the day, after 12;50 pm, and to find Mallory's body so far west, is to have them continue on to the base of the summit pyramid.  Somervell and Norton had reported it to be only about 200 ft above them at Norton's high point and not too difficult ( The Last Climb ).  They would then have had an option available to them.   Return at some time back down the ridge or drop down the Coulior, return along this known climbable route to Camp VI.  This would eliminate the need to go back down over the Second Step. The choice to drop to the lower line for return could have been made days earlier or once they got up the Second Step and realized the difficulty presented in going down it. It doesn't matter.  The Coulior is the connection from the ridge line, I think just above the Third Step, to the Somervell and Norton traverse line.  I do not see any other route that could have gotten him (them) off the ridge line, lower, and still be found that far west and in reasonably good state of condition.

A.) [Jochen] The general assumption in the debate Mallory route vs. Norton's Traverse has been that there is no possibility to reach the ridge from Norton's traverse beyond the Second Step unless one reaches the Subsidiary Couloir leading out of the Great Couloir. The exit of this couloir is on the opposite side of the summit snowfield from the Third Step. No-one has ever done this traverse (a climber got lost in the vicinity on the way down from the summit in 1994 and died of exhaustion before he could reach the North-east Ridge above the Second Step). Only Wager & Wyn Harris attempted to reach the ridge from a point SW of the Second Step, and failed. Personally, I doubt that Mallory & Irvine - if they had made it to above the Second Step or on to the summit - would have descended by a route the upper part of which was completely unknown (all the way down from the summit to the awkward traverse between the Great and Subsidiary Couloirs). However, Frank Smythe suggested in 1937 that they might have angled down from below the FIRST STEP by way of Norton's traverse in order to avoid the numerous gullies and ledges encountered in their approach to the ridge crest. Dave Hahn once said that this variation did not look like an obvious choice to him, but nevertheless it could provide an answer to the questions you outline. If you believe Odell, then M & I must have followed the ridge and personally I think they are likely to have stuck to their route of ascent on the way down. Once below the difficult part, i.e. below the First Step, things might have looked different, especially in near darkness - but the issue is not easy to resolve.

Q.) Maybe some oxygen bottles and possibly their oxygen carrying packs will some day be found near the base of the summit pyramid.  They did not believe that oxygen was of any value when going down.  Is this an open area that climbers would be taking different routes through?  Could Mallory's mind set on keeping to the ridge influence the way they would come into this area verses today's climbing route (s)?

Did they go to the top?  I don't know.  Irvine doesn't appear to have an ice ax and the rest of the way is mainly on snow and ice.  I don't know where George's ax is either.  The missing picture of Ruth Mallory, five unaccounted for oxygen bottles, two backpacks to carry them, a camera that I seriously doubt will be found on Irvine's body do to ... well, I don't want to get into that here, all on a mountain that is moving at nearly one inch per year

A.) [Jochen] " I don't think that the plateau above the Second Step is as open an area as to consider different routes. Perhaps Mallory's intention to stick to the crest played a role in climbing the First and, even more important, the Third Step (Odell's sighting reads like an account of ascending the Third Step along the crest, although it as been bypassed as well). There have been discussions going on that Irvine's ax was discarded or lost on the way DOWN (perhaps to have his hands free for descending the cliffs of the Yellow Band, knowing that any snowy part of the route was now behind them). Mallory's ax could easily have been lost in the accident. Five unaccounted for oxygen bottles? There is sufficient reason to believe that the five on the Stella letter envelope, which you probably meant, were selected by Mallory at the Camp III dump and brought up by porters on June 5. The five bottles are likely to have been part of the six bottles listed on the equipment list found on Mallory's body, as other bottles were already on the Col at the time. The absence of any backpacks and the single part that's ever been found of the oxygen apparatus tucked away in one of Mallory's pocket - strong indications that they had used up all their oxygen before the time of the accident (7.5 h if they had used two bottles each, 11 h if they had used three).

Q.) After reading "High" about the 1982 Northeast Ridge expedition on Everest, I was wondering if any later expeditions found any sign of Peter Boardman and Joe Tasker, and what might have gone wrong for them. Paul

A.) [Jochen] Read my paper, "Where are you know, Pete and Joe?, on this website for what is known so far. I am currently trying to tie up a few remaining loose ends, though.

The Book

Ghosts of Everest; The Search for Mallory & Irvine  by Jochen Hemmleb, Eric Simonson, Larry Johnson  

Hardcover - 208 pages (October 1999)  The Mountaineers Books;  Price reduced !

The papers:

Jochen Hemmleb's Research Papers

  • More Answers from Jochen later this week.
  • Also on Mallory & Irvine: Questions from the Staff at EverestNews.com (our turn) to Graham, Jochen, and/or Eric [and any others] or EverestNews.com many readers to answer !

Many of the behind the scenes questions.

For Example: Let's suppose the camera is found. Does it not belong to the family ? And is the film not copyrighted ?? Can anyone else publish the film ?

Maybe we can go in-depth on these Questions and others.

Daily News: 2/14/2000 Report

  • Everest Spring 2000 Expedition South Side:

Byron Smith http://cbc.ca/news/indepth/everest2000/

The 39-year-old who was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba plans his second attempt on Everest beginning in March 2000. His site has been updated with the planned Educational Program. Also Trivia Game and Crossword !

His Expedition Everest 2000 has contracted Science Alberta Foundation to develop a multidisciplinary education program for Canadian students. Students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 will participate in a virtual field trip to the "Top of the World." Teachers will appreciate the easy access to relevant, prepackaged lesson plans and activities. Students will enjoy the innovative, hands-on format of the Everest 2000 activities. Each group of lessons will include geography, science, mathematics, language arts, and physical education activities. This education program appears to be one of the best ever offered.

Check Byron out ! http://cbc.ca/news/indepth/everest2000/

  • Check out the home page www.everestnews.com for many of the Everest 2000 expedition links and information.

  

Daily News: 2/12/2000 Report

  • Everest Spring 2000 Expedition South Side:

Spanish Everest 2000 www.lacenet.org You will need to Join (in upper left hand corner)

A South Side Expedition with many experienced climbers including expeditions to Manaslu (1991), Makalu (1976), Everest (1983 and 1985), Lothse (1980), and  the expedition Doctor, Pep Aced who has been participated in eight expeditions Kanchenjunga (1978), Annapurna IV (1979), Disthgil Sar (1982), Saipal (1985), Makalu (1988 and 1990), K2 (1995). The Spanish were very successful in 95 on K2 as you can see on our K2 Summits page sumk2.htm.  

The Cooperative Telematic Project, 'From Montserrat to Mount Everest', consists in the educational accompaniment, through a virtual expedition, of the real mountaineering team that will try to climb to the top of Mount Everest in May 2000, sponsored mainly by the Caixa de Manresa and La Vanguardia.

Using the Internet, we will propose different activities in order to bring everyone closer to this expedition and to show its main characteristics, how it is planned, and the challenge it presents for its members. We'll also consider the Himalayan region, its people, their way of life, etc.

"Project LaceNet" was born two years ago, with the goal of introducing the Central Catalonian educational centers to the Internet. In the first edition, we carried out the project "Discover the Bages County", and in the second, we offered a "Virtual trip to Antarctica", in which Argentinian schools participated. In the current school year (99-00), we are presenting "From Montserrat to Mount Everest". This is a project addressed to the Bages County, Spain and the international public. The project is sponsored by the Fundaciσ caixaManresa and has the support of European SchoolNet and I*EARN-Pangea.

This expedition has many plans. Please check out their many pages. Make sure you find the Activities page. Many educational activities for students. Activities will be available on the project website from January 1, 2000 until the middle of the following June. As for educational centers, teachers will be able to define the length and rhythm of their classes' participation and individual participation. For everyone there will be some activities that continue for the life of the project and others that have a limited time frame.

EverestNews.com plans to work closely with this expedition along with many others to bring You news from Everest.

  

Daily News: 2/11/2000 Report

  • Another Everest Spring 2000 Expedition (There are many this year...):

Retena Expedition Odyssey Everest 2000

Six Spanish climbers, will try to be first Expedition to reach the summit of Everest in 2000. Inaki Ochoa, Jose Mari Onate Perez, Koldo Aldaz, Carlos Pauner, Mikel Zabalza and Antonio Akerreta will be part of a National Geographic team. The expedition will not use oxygen and climb from the North Side.

This is an experienced team with climbers having 8000 meter experience.

  • Did you know ?

In 1993, the first climbers to reach the Summit of Everest were Ngati Sherpa and Heo Young Ho via the North Ridge descending down the South East ridge.

Some of other climbers who reached the Summit in 1993 included:

Pasang Lhamu (who dies on the way down), Alex Lowe, Mike Groom (without oxygen), Jan Arnold, Oscar Cadiach (without oxygen), Valdimir Bashkirov (without oxygen), Eric Gramond (without oxygen), Hubert Giot (without oxygen), Ginette Harrison, Gary Pfisterer, Graham Hoyland, Jon Tinker, and many others.

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