8000 Meter Peaks

Everest
K2
Kangchenjunga
Lhotse
Makalu
Cho Oyu
Dhaulagiri
Manaslu
Nanga Parbat
Annapurna
Gasherbrum
Broad Peak
Shishapangma
Pakistan

Seven Summits

Everest
Aconcagua
Denali
Kilimanjaro
Elbrus
Vinson Massif
Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Kosciusko

Without our sponsors, you wouldn't see this site, please visit our sponsors. 

imax.gif (11898 bytes)  

 K2 2000 Day 46-55

K2 2000 Coverage with Waldemar Niclevicz reporting for Project K2 and Gary Pfisterer reporting with the American International Expedition! Included is news on other climbers on the mountain including Hans Kammerlander, Araceli Segarra and many others. 

Day 55

Waldemar Niclevicz, disappointed by the bad weather, today morning, when passed by the camp, towards base. Photo by Marco Camandona

Camp 2 (6500 meters) / Base Camp (5100 meters)

Bad Weather frustrates 6th Lunge

Unbelievable, but we are back to Base Camp, after a new lunge without progress. I’m  really sorry . We have been disappointed by the weather. We are sad because we can’t go further. Our patience is at its limits. Everything seemed different, even the weather forecast seemed  to be in favor of us, but at the last minute before our departure, on Friday, a new weather forecast arrived reporting everything we were afraid of: strong winds, intense blizzards, fog and avalanches. Everything was set, we were all going up in one strong, enthusiastic group. All of us completely focused on our goal.  We wished the forecast was wrong, as it had been many times before.  Sadly, as our bad luck has gone, the forecast was completely correct and the weather punished us a lot. 

We arrived at Camp 2 on Friday (6050 meters) very frightened, immense avalanches passed beside us, as though the mountain was losing enormous pieces.  Two Americans were taken some tens of meters down (Andy and Christy, no problems), while my porters and I looked the scene hung on the top of a rock tower.

After the avalanches, on Saturday, we went to Camp 2 (6500 meters). It was other  tough day. The strong fog prevented us from seeing  where the avalanches came from, so we heard the noise and soon a mass of snow  passed some  tens of meters far. An enormous uncomfortable feeling for the spirit and furthermore the body couldn’t support  stronger and stronger winds. The wind blowing at  80 to 100 km/hour prevented us from moving up. Staying inside the tents all day long, there was 25 people: Koreans, Americans and us, wishing to go on a lot. But from that moment on nature showed its tremendous power, and no human being dared to challenge it. Today we all went down to Base Camp asking ourselves why the weather was so bad.  Now all we can do is wait! 

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 54: Two Updates for You again today ! See Editorial note below. 

Update from the American International Expedition

Update from Fabrizio on July 25 

Things are starting to get a little bit dangerous on the Abruzzi. On the 21st a bunch of people from all the teams went up to Camp 1, but as it rained so much lately - possibly up to 6100 meters- the slopes were loaded and ready to avalanche. With approx. 20 people tramping about, combined with the noon heat, the slopes went, luckily nobody was hurt, but Andy Evans was buried to mid chest but the ropes held. Good team work early on resulted in solid and safe ropes up to Camp 1. Thankful for that!  However on the 22nd when the Italians, Ivan and myself (followed by the friendly Korean team), went directly to Camp 2 we were bombarded by a significant number of medium sized beach ball sized rocks. I now know how to say ROCK! in many languages. Arriving at Camp 1 was no safe haven either. The Italians wouldn't go in their tents due to the rock fall set off by the 20 climbers heading for Camp 2 that had spent the previous night in Camp 1. Ivan and I felt our tent was far enough out of the main firing line but every time the Italians would scream we would scramble around the tent like mice looking for a safe nook, the best we could do was hide behind our backpacks. Not great protection, but nothing actually made contact. I hate the high pitched whine of falling rocks even more now. 

Our trip to Camp 2 was the most pleasurable so far. We waited until the crowds would have mostly made it to the tents before we set off. We had the route to ourselves and were loving it. There was not a major buildup of snow, I guess from the 100 mile an hour winds. We just climbed with a light breeze and minimal weight in our packs. (That still amounted to over 12 kgs each as we had another tent, stove, food, fuel and extra clothes.) I climbed House's Chimney without a jumar and found Andy's 5.7 or Scottish IV+ grading just about right. Ivan and I arrived at about 4pm and thanks to a lot of help from Billy, we were in the tent at 5pm. In the tent and there was now pretty strong wind. So strong that we think 5 of the 8 tents in the Camp are torn or destroyed. The tent that Ivan and I got into had a small problem, the zippers wouldn't close all the way, on the doors, so we were stuck spending the whole night replacing a makeshift 'cork' of socks, shirts and stuff sacks into the five inch gaps. Still a lot of snow got in and our sleeping bags and down suits were soaked, not that it mattered much as I never left the tent the next day. In fact not many people left their tents in Camp 2 that day. With 60 to80 mile an hour winds there was not much point. So after 37 hours cramped, wet and cold I crawled out of the tent at 5am and headed back down the ropes. Ivan had insisted on an early start, regardless of the fact it was still howling out and since the sun hadn't been up for long it was quite cold. But he was right, about 20 people soon followed our lead but we were well clear of the rock fall by the time they started chucking them down. 

So, once again we are in Base Camp sitting out unclimbable weather. The wind is again blowing quite strong. The cycle of climb to Camp 2 and then retreat in bad weather is starting to frustrate some people. Walking around base camp today it seems all the other teams will pull out on August 15. Hamish, from our team departed today for personal reasons. He was a great addition to our team and will certainly be missed, Andy Evans and Chris are leaving on the 4th.

The worrying news around Base Camp is one of the Japanese Broad Peak expeditions tried to go for the summit today, but after making a mid afternoon radio call from about 7700 meters to say they were turning around due to the wind, they have not been heard from again. It is now 10pm. The slopes leading to the notch are loaded and the Hungarians were not able to make a summit attempt as there high camp at 7200 meters had been avalanched off the mountain when they went up with the Japanese two days ago. Everybody in base camp is thinking about them and wishing them the best o f luck getting down safely. We are all hoping it is just a problem with the radio, the last radio call was weak and there is a problem with the line of sight. Lets hope. The other Broad Peak news is that the Czech, Hungarian, Korean and other Japanese teams have called it quits. They are all going home. Through a network of cooks and porters we have heard that nobody has gone to the summit of either of the Gasherbrums.

[Editorial Note: Note this Update is a little old. It was undated but appears to be written before Gary's Update yesterday. For the status of the Japanese see yesterday's update from Gary, on G2 there has been Summits as we reported...]

Time to wait. No big deal. Hope all is well, Wish us luck Fabrizio

Fabrizio is a member of the American International Expedition: For a complete list of the members see the Team members lists below.

Camp 2 (6700 meters) / Camp 3 (7450 meters)

54th day of the Expedition K2 2000 

Today we are going to overcome 7 thousand meters at last in order to set Camp 3 (7450 meters). The great difficulty in those parts in rocks, 4 and 5 degree in difficulty, is to face the big amount of snow, that we will meet over 7 thousand meters. Snow can reach up to  the waist, becoming hard the climb. Weather forecast for Today: The weather will keep stable in the morning and variable in the afternoon; sunny until midday. During the afternoon may be cloudy and  some light snow may fall.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

[Editorial Note: Some of the staff thinks, let's call it a hunch, that they will top out with the next attempt ...may their faith guide them safely.]

Day 53

Update from the American International Expedition

26 July Update: Mass exodus from Camp II on 24 July.  26 of 30 people in Camp II descended to Base Camp.  We had three members and one member of the original Korean team remaining in Camp II hoping for better weather on the  25th.  The weather did improve but the wind returned with the high pressure.  As a result the holdouts in Camp II returned to Base Camp on the 25th.  Today dawned one of the best days in recent history.  There was still quite a lot of wind up high but otherwise the weather seems vastly improved...for how long???  Mr. Um's team has an aggressive schedule for their porters who were sent back up the hill yesterday with the intention of having them put in a Camp III an IV with the team members following tomorrow.  We have one member heading back up today to Camp I and five others following tomorrow going directly to Camp II a ten to twelve hour push.  The rest of the team will follow on the 28th weather permitting.

Meanwhile on Broad Peak the huge consolidated summit push for the 24th fell flat in the bad weather.  Everyone but the Japanese bailed.  They set off yesterday 25th for the summit with I think 8 people.  They got a late start, but were using oxygen.  Most turned back and returned to their high camp in the early evening.  Two were apparently out all night.  Four members set off back up this morning but turned back about 10 am. I think they were off to look for their mates.  It turned out that the two who stayed out made the summit per their L.O. [liaison officer].  Anyway all reported safe.  Broad Peak information not verified.

So the weather continues to be our main nemesis.  Either snow and wet or clear and windy up high.  We will continue to keep trying and sooner or later hopefully we will get the break we need to press on.  Lunch is ready so all for now.

Cheers, Gary Pfisterer 

Camp 1 ( 6050 meters)/ Camp 2 (6700 meters)

53rd day of the Expedition K2 2000.

Going to Camp 2

We keep on climbing with all enthusiasm and an immense hope the weather helps us to get the heights of  8611 meters of K2. The messages in next days were written beforehand, because it's impossible to bring our communication equipment mountain up. I know it's hard to imagine what will be happening around here but think positively and God willing everything will succeed. Weather forecast for today: Sunny or partially cloudy. It's no forecast blizzards or storms, there will be clouds in the afternoon. Light elevation of temperature. Danger of avalanche.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 is sponsored by O Boticário, Tam, net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 52

Marco Camandona, Waldemar Niclevicz and Abele Blanc, receiving the weather forecast at Base Camp.
Base Camp (5100 meters) / Camp 1 (6050 meters)

52nd day of the Expedition K2 2000

Starting the 6th lunge

My Dear friends, 

The weather is not wonderful, but it is not the worse. So, shyly, we are going to start our new lunge to K2, wishing the weather gets better while we go up.

I don't know how many days we are going to be up high. We will do our best to set Camp 3 (7450 meters) and perhaps, if the weather is really good, try to reach the summit of K2. For all that, we need 4 or 5 days. It'll depend on the weather, conditions and quantity of snow that we'll find in front of us.

Let's hope we can really have the right conditions to go further. We're going with several alpinists (climbers). Our expedition, the Koreans and the Americans. We hope to work as a group to bring us good results.

The weather forecast for today: Sunny or partially cloudy with some clouds in the afternoon. Light elevation of temperature. High risk of avalanches.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 is sponsored by O Boticário, Tam, net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

And two Updates from the Leader of the American International Expedition

Hi Everyone,

Before I forget to mention it we have four members of the team that will be leaving Base Camp on the 4th of August.  Their departure will terminate our phone and e-mail contact with the outside world.  I will be in touch again before that but we will not be able to receive e-mail after that date. 

Since my last contact various members have attempted to get back up the hill three times only to be turned around at Camp I or below by wind and snow.  We are going a bit stir crazy here in Base Camp, so the most desperate among us (those here longest) set off with the least glimmer of sun as much for the diversion and exercise as with the hope of the weather actually holding so that we can get something meaningful accomplished.

However!!! The weather has gone the best in recent history last evening and today and according to sources who will remain unnamed and have been 100% wrong to date it is supposed to stay settled for at least another 3-4 days.  Four of the team went up this morning and other three or four will follow tomorrow with the remainder the day after.  This push if successful will see Camp IV established at 8050 meters and possibly even a summit attempt. All teams still here are scrambling to get on the hill so it will likely be a bit of a zoo.

Hans Kammerlander packed up and left on the 20th and Voytek went as well.  The Czechs and Swedes on Broad Peak left as well.  A number of other teams are running out of time and planning to leave around the end of the month.

Hope everyone is having a great summer, even we are luxuriating in the sun today! Hopefully this change will continue for a while.  All the best.  

Cheers, Gary

Above message typed on 21 July.....Update 23 July:

Cloud came into Base Camp about 6:00pm on 22nd.  It rained all night to about 6000 meters.  There are now 29 people in Camp II at 6700 meters waiting for the weather to clear to move up.  We have 7 members there.  The bulk of all other teams are there as well.  All of them are planning to stay at least today 23rd and most will stay tomorrow as well hoping for improvement.  At their elevation they are apparently near the top of the cloud and get periodic sun giving away to overcast and snow with anywhere from 20 to 40 MPH winds.  Not sure when this message will be sent off as all our tech wizards are on the hill.  Meanwhile will continue to update.

Cheers Gary

Day 52

Marco Camandona, Waldemar Niclevicz and Abele Blanc, receiving the weather forecast at Base Camp.
Base Camp (5100 meters) / Camp 1 (6050 meters)

52nd day of the Expedition K2 2000

Starting the 6th lunge

My Dear friends, 

The weather is not wonderful, but it is not the worse. So, shyly, we are going to start our new lunge to K2, wishing the weather gets better while we go up.

I don't know how many days we are going to be up high. We will do our best to set Camp 3 (7450 meters) and perhaps, if the weather is really good, try to reach the summit of K2. For all that, we need 4 or 5 days. It'll depend on the weather, conditions and quantity of snow that we'll find in front of us.

Let's hope we can really have the right conditions to go further. We're going with several alpinists (climbers). Our expedition, the Koreans and the Americans. We hope to work as a group to bring us good results.

The weather forecast for today: Sunny or partially cloudy with some clouds in the afternoon. Light elevation of temperature. High risk of avalanches.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 is sponsored by O Boticário, Tam, net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

And two Updates from the Leader of the American International Expedition

Hi Everyone,

Before I forget to mention it we have four members of the team that will be leaving Base Camp on the 4th of August.  Their departure will terminate our phone and e-mail contact with the outside world.  I will be in touch again before that but we will not be able to receive e-mail after that date. 

Since my last contact various members have attempted to get back up the hill three times only to be turned around at Camp I or below by wind and snow.  We are going a bit stir crazy here in Base Camp, so the most desperate among us (those here longest) set off with the least glimmer of sun as much for the diversion and exercise as with the hope of the weather actually holding so that we can get something meaningful accomplished.

However!!! The weather has gone the best in recent history last evening and today and according to sources who will remain unnamed and have been 100% wrong to date it is supposed to stay settled for at least another 3-4 days.  Four of the team went up this morning and other three or four will follow tomorrow with the remainder the day after.  This push if successful will see Camp IV established at 8050 meters and possibly even a summit attempt. All teams still here are scrambling to get on the hill so it will likely be a bit of a zoo.

Hans Kammerlander packed up and left on the 20th and Voytek went as well.  The Czechs and Swedes on Broad Peak left as well.  A number of other teams are running out of time and planning to leave around the end of the month.

Hope everyone is having a great summer, even we are luxuriating in the sun today! Hopefully this change will continue for a while.  All the best.  

Cheers, Gary

Above message typed on 21 July.....Update 23 July:

Cloud came into Base Camp about 6:00pm on 22nd.  It rained all night to about 6000 meters.  There are now 29 people in Camp II at 6700 meters waiting for the weather to clear to move up.  We have 7 members there.  The bulk of all other teams are there as well.  All of them are planning to stay at least today 23rd and most will stay tomorrow as well hoping for improvement.  At their elevation they are apparently near the top of the cloud and get periodic sun giving away to overcast and snow with anywhere from 20 to 40 MPH winds.  Not sure when this message will be sent off as all our tech wizards are on the hill.  Meanwhile will continue to update.

Cheer Gary

Day 51 

Today,  rain at base-camp all day long, the weather keeps bad disappointing the alpinists. Photo by Waldemar Niclevicz.
Base Camp (5100 meters) 51st day of the Expedition K2 2000

Rain at Base-camp

Unbelievable, my friends, but we woke up today at 5 a. m., in order to start a new lunge to K2 and to our surprise and disappointment it was "raining" !!!! That's true, raining at 5100 meters which means bad weather. We were enthusiastic about the weather forecast sent by our friend Dani Ramirez, take a look what we were expecting:

"According to my sources, satellites, maps and other means it is confirming a short time without storms, in the next 4 or 5 days. I can't dare to say good weather, because I still see some clouds by satellite, but there won't be bad weather.  There will be strong winds on the summit. If it happens it will be a good opportunity to attack the summit. Thursday the 20th: partially cloudy sky, with some openings and sun in the morning. Low possibilities of snowing. In the afternoon, clouds and some fog on the summit. Isotherm 0 degree at 4,500 m, with minimum  of -25 and -18 degrees C at the summit. Take care with strong  South  winds "

"Well, unfortunately, our Spanish meteorologist has no guilt. Our destiny to climb K2 depends totally on his forecast, without Dani's help we will not succeed. What I really want to show you, is that to forecast the weather for  K2 is very hard, with the monsoon getting close. And also, I want to show you our affliction in front of such weather instability, that has been lasting for 23 days. What can we do? Wait, my friends, wait. And patience... because the weather can get better at any moment, maybe tomorrow! And when it gets better, let's go with faith and put our Brazilian Flag on the top of K2. Insha Ala! 

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 50

Hans Kammerlander saying good-bye to Waldemar Niclevicz this morning at  K2's Base Camp. Photo by Marco Camandona

Base-camp (5100 meters) Expedition K2 2000

Kammerlander gives up trying to climb K2

Unfortunately this is no joke. Hans has really given up on reaching the summit of K2 this year and has started his return to Italy. Kammerlander left the base camp this morning, followed by his partner Konrad Auer. He believes that the meteorological conditions will stay unfavorable this season. One of the best and most famous alpinists nowadays, could not continue to waste 22 consecutive bad weather days, that we have had at K2 .

Kammerlander's giving up was met with great disappointment by all the remaining expeditions.  The hope was that all remaining climbers would join forces for one final attack on the mountain. Hans and Konrad's departures reduces this effort by two very great and strong alpinists.  They would have made a big difference in terms of adding to the technical and physical performances required to finish this climb successfully. 

I remember last year, when Kammerlander gave up, a series of others gave up in other expeditions, making it not viable to conclude the goal. The number of alpinists that remained at K2 wasn't enough to face the many hard conditions that the mountain presented. So, I hope that our colleagues alpinists, that are around here, don't get discouraged and give up too. To accomplish the climb till the end we need to combine efforts to win against the unfavorable conditions that must be faced (abundant snow at high altitudes, strong winds and lack of visibility).

Let's be optimistic. We still have a good  team of alpinists here. Abele, Marco and I and the Koreans and Americans are in great physical condition and ready to carry out the final attack to the heights of 8611 meters. For that, it is just necessary  for the weather to give us a truce. The idea is to form a group  from 10 to 15 alpinists,  who will alternate the front in order to avoid anyone climber becoming worn out. I am sure that in these conditions we can accomplish our dream to climb this big mountain, God willing.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 49: Base Camp  (5100 meters) 49th day of the Expedition K2 2000

As I had promised you yesterday, I put the weather forecast from our Spanish friend Dani Ramirez on online which he sent us. Dani is being for us, alpinists that are trying to climb K2  in Pakistan, a true guardian angel. The forecast although they succeed in 70%,  is addressing all our strategy for climbing. Now, for example, we intend to leave the base-camp just when the forecast is  favorable. I thank for Dani Ramirez' efforts to help us, he's is, as all of us, a member of our expedition.

Weather Forecast for K2 - 07/18th/2000

General Situation

It continues the eternal instability and stronger blizzards. On the photos of the satellite can be observed the same; clouds and more clouds  above Karakorum. The monsoon keeps on affecting India and Nepal (Himalayans) and starts reaching Pakistan. The forecast indicates still a couple of cloudy days and some blizzards, that not seem strong. From Thursday on,  the 20th, the weather may get better for three days. The truth is that the great scale  weather forecast maps announce, but we need to wait a little longer to draw a conclusion, micro climate speaking. Concerning  the present summer, I'd rather not rely much on 3-day longer maps.

Forecast day by day: Tuesday 18th: Cloudy sky almost all day long and high possibilities of snowing, that on  K2 may be of moderate intensity. Abundant fog, still stronger winds SW. A 997 millibars storm in the center of Pakistan, with isotherm  0 degree at 4,400 meters. Little decrease of temperature.

Wednesday 19th : Weather a little more variable, alternating  a little sun. Possibilities of snow showers on K2, that doesn't look very important. Light elevation of temperatures, with isotherm 0 degree at 4,600 m.

Thursday: 20th and Friday 21st:  Clearer openings on the sky, clouds less thick and an elevation of the daily temperature. It may be a little cloudy on Thursday, but sunnier on Friday. This improvement may last until Saturday 22.

That's all folks, a great hug for our Guard Angel, Dani Ramirez and let's cheer for the weather gets better as soon as possible.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Update from Gary Pfisterer's American International Expedition!

Hello Everybody, 

Who would have guessed it possible? K2 is back in storm. Everybody attempting K2 is grounded. Very few of us have ever seen winds like this before. In Camp 1 at 6100 meters the winds were blowing up hill and getting under the tents and lifting people off the ground! Ivan and I aborted our summit attempt late on the second day above Camp 2 when we saw what was heading our way. The monsoon clouds have arrived and we are presently watching the most spectacular cloud formations as the wind funnels them through the gap between Broad Peak and K2. Know we know why it is called Windy Gap on the map. Our route - the Abruzzi Ridge - really does get hammered by the wind. Trust me, it will require great conditions to summit. 

We have been at base camp for 40 days and some people are starting to show
sign of fatigue and frustration. Hans Kammerlander and his team have decided to call for porters. They don't see how things are going to change for the better in less than 10 days. I had lunch with his team a short while ago and I am sad to see them go, they are strong and talented. They were on the Abruzzi last year and were turned around by waist deep snow at 8300 meters. This summer they tried the much easier South-South East Spur, the route by which the first team to the mountain this summer, arriving six weeks before us, were able to summit. (All eight members of t he team reached the summit, all but one using bottled oxygen, in two teams of four on the27th and 29th of June. The first team to reach the top of K2 in three years.) Kammerlander arrived the day they summitted and chose the route because all of the route was fixed - rope preplaced - and the Koreans had left two tents on the route that were still in good condition. This was the obvious choice for someone who has been here twice before and just wanted the summit. Given that the route is already in and half of the needed tents are there Hans still felt the conditions too dangerous and opted to leave. (As I write this he has just come to say good bye and exchange addresses. He is not waiting the three days until his porters come. He has left.) 

The Brazilian team, who arrived a week after us, which is really one Brazilian, Waldemar Niclevicz, and two Italian guides, Abele Blanc and Marco Camandano, with the support of four Balti High Altitude Porters. They have decided to stick it out with us. Both Waldemar and Abele have been here twice before and I guess are sick of life on the Godwin-Austen Glacier, where base camp (or the strip as it is called) is located. Ivan and I joined them for lunch a few weeks ago and enjoy their relaxed attitude to climbing K2. You should have seen Ivan, in the shear weight of Spaghetti and proscuitto that he consumed at lunch. We had a lot o fun with them, communicating in Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and English.

If we just continue the lunch time tour of the strip as it seems this email has turned into you would quickly come to the three Korean teams that are remaining. That makes four in total that have come to K2 this summer. The running joke at base camp is that instead of a Pakistani visa we should have applied for a Korean visa. You would be hard pressed to miss the stench of drying fish that lines the middle 150 meters of the strip. The closest Korean camp to us is the team we have been working very closely with the entire expedition. They are a very nice bunch of young climbers. Even though only one member, a non-climbing base camp manager, speaks English we have had some fun together. The language barrier has led to some funny situations, once when Mr. Whang and we were together on the black Pyramid we had to radioed down to base camp so we could figure out just how much rope we both had in our rucksacks. We were both tied to one piton, standing on a small ledge with a few thousand meters of air between us and the ground. Mr. Whang is their top climber and I have enjoyed our time climbing together, that same day we looked out over the Karakoram, and at 7300 meters we saw a lot of it. We pointed at peaks we wanted to climb and said perhaps we would climb some of them together. We both agreed to climb K2 first and then discuss future plans later. 

I reported the last time about my interaction with one of the other Korean teams, led by Mr. Um. We don't really spend any time with them, and to be honest after I lost three nights' sleep due to not being able to lie on my back from the rock fall they spilled on me just below House's Chimney. I really haven't felt too social . The other Korean team is climbing Broad Peak first and have not come over to us to say hello, nor ask for permission to use our fixed rope. It seems strange to us as it would just be polite of them. 

There is only one other team in base camp and it is really a great pleasure to have them here. It is a two man Japanese/Polish Expedition to the unclimbed East Face. Conditions are so menacing that trying a major new route seems totally out of question now. So they are hemming and hawing over what to do. The dynamic due is none other than Yasushi Yamonoi and Voytek Kurtyka! I have had an exceptionally great time in their company. To spend time with two of the great 'masters' - as Ivan and I have taken to calling them - is out of this world. 

If you don't know Yasushi, he made the first winter ascent of Fitzroy, solo, and put up a new route on the South West face of Cho Oyu, again solo. He has done a lot more, but that's a good enough intro. Voytek made the first ascent of the West Face of Gasherbrum IV with Robert Shauer, alpine style. He also made the first traverse of all three of Broad Peak's summits, alpine style with Jerzy Kukuczka, and of course so many other ground breaking ascents. I have learned a lot about why I climb from discussions the three of us have had. It is great to talk to people who can help you express show you feel, especially when you know they are equally as  passionate. 

So all there is to do is wait. Ivan and I are going serac climbing in the icefall this afternoon to stay in shape and pass the time. My flight home is not until September 9th so there must be another chance before then! Does anybody have a good weather forecast for the upper Baltoro? 

Hope all is well, wish us luck! Fabrizio 

Day 48

Base Camp (5100 meters) 48th day of the Expedition K2 2000

Weather still bad

Dark day, fog, snow, wind all day long. It is practically the worst day since we arrived at K2. The Americans wait for good weather at Camp 1 (6050 meters). The Korean team tried to get to Camp 2 (6700 meters) but it was impossible. The wind was too strong and the visibility was less than 5 meters. Our hopes are for  good weather. The full moon has gone away. The monsoon, wet winds that bring constant storms, is present in the South of Pakistan. So, within two weeks the monsoon may reach the Karakorum mountains located in the North of Pakistan, where K2 is located . We are expecting news from our meteorologist friends. Kammerlander receives news direct from Innsbruck, Austria. I receive from Dani Ramines, meteorologist in Barcelona, Spain. We exchange information  and try to foresee the next few days. It is very hard, even with our experts friends, because the weather changes so quickly here, and it is difficult to get a very precise forecast for more than two days in advance. It is good to remind you that a forecast, is just a "forecast", based on images via satellite. It is impossible to assure what will happen. But, undoubtedly, it is a good help for us alpinists. Tomorrow I will put on K2 online the next forecast, that we will receive tonight,  so that you can have an idea how our friend Dani Ramirez is helping us. To avoid getting worn out, facing storms in superior altitudes, we have decided to wait for good weather here at Base Camp. The forecast we receive here by Internet. Thus, in the next good weather period we intend to reach the 8611 meter Summit of K2 and we hope it happens as soon as possible. There is no time to waste, because the monsoon can arrive at any moment. 

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 47

The landscape that we have seen all day long today here at Base Camp.  Photo by Waldemar Niclevicz
Base Camp (5100 meters)

Resting at Base Camp

It seems like a long time ago but during our first lunge on K2, June 19, we set a tent at our Camp 2 at 6500 meters.  Since this time we have done four other lunges without going further than 6900 meters.  Not enough when the mountain is 8611 meters high.  It shows that we have accomplished something but there is still a lot of work to be done.  Today, Hassan, one of our skilled porters who has already climbed Nanga Parbat, told me "Don't worry, Sir, we just need four consecutive good days to finish the climb and then we can go away". My problem, that Hassan doesn't know and maybe many people don't know either, is that I've been waiting for four consecutive good days for three years! Three bids trying to climb this big mountain to get at this right moment: We beg Mother Nature the opportunity of having 4 good days, so that I can end the climbing safety and successfully.

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá.

Day 46

K2 2000 Coverage: Today's Updates from K2 (Two !)

Camp 2 at Abruzzi Spur, at 6700 meters surrounded by dark clouds full of snow. Photo by Waldemar Niclevicz.

Italian climber Hans Kammerlander has been stopped again by snow!  The former climbing partner of Reinhold Messner announced today that he will not go for the summit of K2 this year due to heavy snow conditions high on the mountain. Kammerlander attempted K2 one year ago and had to turn back for the same reason. 

"It has been snowing continuously for the last 21 days. This situation has given us no realistic chances.  I take my backpack and head back, it is the only safe way out of here" said Kammerlander a few hours ago to his manager Sigi Pichler via satellite phone. 

Kammerlander was attempting the summit along with his partner, the Italian guide, Konrad Auer. Their goal was to reach the summit and descend on skies, something never done before.  "I had to leave my skies at camp III (8000 meters).  I think they will lay there forever" said Kammerlander, suggesting that he will not try again. "K2 is my worst dream, I guess" said Kammerlander

Source:  Luigi Zoppello, Trento, Italy

Base Camp (5100meters)  46th day of K2 2000

My friends who follow K2 online are surely awaiting good news.  I am sorry that our 5th lunge towards the summit was one of the worst.  The terrible weather did not allow our efforts to be successful.  And our desire, my friends was immense, so big that we even had planed an attack to the summit, if the weather got better. But everything failed.  All we have seen in the last few days are dark clouds, much snow and wind so cold that it freezes the soul. 

Myself and 4 high altitude porters waited at Camp II (6700 meters) for two nights with Abele and Marcos waiting a little below us at 6500 meters.  With every radio contact we hoped the weather would be getting better and we could continue upward.  Sadly, all we could see was the nylon of the tent crumbling in the wind and the snow trying to bury our small shelter.

So with the weather having been unstable for the last 18 days (we have had some afternoon or mornings with blue sky, but not a full days worth) Kammerlander has commented that on July 20 he will go away, summit or not!  We know this is not a joke.  The reality is inside each one of us.  We are eager to finish climbing, worn out by this long waiting. The mountain always has the last word. 

Waldemar Niclevicz

Project K2 2000 is  sponsored by O Boticário, TAM, Net Vírtua and Sportsjá. 

Day 56-65

Day 46-55

Day 39-45

For previous Reports from K2 see our News Reports Index

 

K2 Team Lists 2000

K2 Summits (before 2000)

 

wpe2.jpg (2012 bytes)

Daily News and Notes, what made this site famous among Everest climbers

Updated Everyday !

 

     

Send Mail to everestnews2004@adelphia.net.   Copyright©1998, 1999, 2000, 2001. EverestNews.com  All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes. Read it.

 

    

Where to get the News and Expedition reports !
 

 

 The Best Source for Gear On-line

Backcountry Gear
Backpacks
Bags & Luggage
Bindings
Binoculars
Blankets & Pillows
Boot & Fabric Care
Cameras
Camp Furniture
Camping Accessories
Car Racks
Carabiners
Cards
Child Carriers
Climbing Bags
Compasses
Cooking Supplies
Cycling Components
Cycling Repair
Dry Bags
Dry Boxes
Electronics
First Aid
Fishing Accessories
Fleece
Float Tubes
Fly Boxes
Fly Line
Fly Rods
Fly Tying
Fly Vests & Packs
Food
Footwear
Gaiters
Gifts & Games
Gloves & Mittens
Goggles
Harnesses
Hats
Helmets
Hydration Packs
Indoor Climbing Gear
Infant Apparel
Jackets
Kayaks
Kid's Cycling Gear
Kid's Paddling Gear
Knives & Tools
Leaders & Tippets
Lifejackets/ PFDs
Lights
Locks
Long Underwear
Maps
Messenger & Bike Bags
Mountaineering Gear
Neckwear
Neoprene
Nets
Paddles & Oars
Paddlewear
Pants
Pet Gear
Poles
Pontoons
Prints & Posters
Rafts
Reels & Spools
Rescue Gear
Rock Climbing Gear
Rod & Reel Kits
Rod Tubes & Bags
Ropes
Shell Outerwear
Shirts
Shorts
Showers & Toilets
Skates & Scooters
Ski & Board Repair
Skirts & Dresses
Skis
Sleds and Tubes
Sleeping Bags & Pads
Snowboards
Snowshoes
Socks
Sprayskirts
Stoves
Strollers
Sunglasses
Sunscreen & Repellant
Sweaters
Swimming
Tents
Travel Accessories
Underwear
Vests
Videos
Waders
Watches & Clocks
Water Bottles & Bags
Water Filtration