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 Lesson 13: Food of Nepal

0081Kevin.jpg (106004 bytes) Welcome to the EverestNews.com Lesson plans developed by Kevin Cherilla ( base camp manager of the NFB 2001 Everest Expedition and 7th and 8th grade physical education teacher from Phoenix, Arizona) and the staff at EverestNews.com, the largest mountaineering publication in the world.

If you would like to hire Kevin as an Everest speaker e-mail us at everestnews2004@adelphia.net today !

Food of Nepal (Click here for some Yummy Nepalese recipes!)

Objective: The students will be able to make up a menu for one day that a typical Nepalese might eat.

Guided Practice:

1. Have the students come up with a menu for one day that a typical American might eat. Write the menu on the chalkboard as the meals are mentioned.
2. Either read the paragraphs on Nepalese food orally or have the students read it silently to themselves.
3. Review with the class the main food that Nepalese eat.

Independent Practice:

1. Read the paragraphs on Nepalese food and answer the questions.
2. Create a menu for a day that a typical Nepalese person might eat.

Optional Extensions:

The students will research what a typical Nepalese meal might be like, including all the courses. Have the students prepare the meal at home and bring in samples for the class.

Reading and Questions:

Just like Americans, the Nepalese eat three meals a day. Breakfast is eaten early and usually consists of hot, sweetened tea and biscuits. Around 10:00 a.m., the Nepalese eat a hot, full meal for lunch. Dinner is usually eaten around 9:00 p.m.

The food that a person might eat depends on their religion, where they live, and their social status. The consumption of beef is banned for those of the Hindu religion. Rice is the staple of all Nepalese food. People who live in the hill country eat quite a bit of potatoes and barley. Potatoes might be boiled or baked and dipped in salt and chiles. Potato pancakes with fresh cheese are another favorite of the hill people.

Most households serve a rice-and-lentils mixture called dhal bhaat. This might be served with vegetables, eggs, spices, and occasional meat. Chicken, lamb, goat, yak, and buffalo are some of the typical meats. Meat is mainly served on special occasions or celebrations. The people of the Terai make a flat bread called Chapati. Chiura is ground rice that is common among the Newars. One favorite dish of the Nepalese is called achar, which is chutney made from large radishes that grow in Nepal.

1. Prepare a menu for one day that a typical Nepalese might eat.
2. What are some differences in the eating habits of Nepalese and Americans?
3. Does religion, location, or social status affect what people eat in the United States?

Food & Beverages

Chappati—flat bread made of flour. Another staple sometimes used in place of rice. 

Chang—home-brewed rice or more traditionally barley beer. Chang is traditionally drunk by the participants during the puja before the climb of Everest. 

Chini—sugar 

Chiso paani—cold water 

Chiyaa—tea 

Dal Bhaat—lentil soup with rice. This is a staple of the Nepalese diet. 

Dhai—yogurt 

Dudh—milk 

Khaana—food 

Maasu—meat 

Momo— steamed or fried pork dumplings 

Nun—salt 

Paani— water 

Phul—egg 

Rakshi—a spirit distilled from rice, potato or grain 

Roti—bread 

Satu—flour 

Suntala—orange (fruit) 

Taato paani—hot water 

Thukpa—noodles, often served in soup 

Tsampa—parched barley flour, a staple food of Tibetans 

Umaleko paani—boiled water

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