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  Everest Spring 2000: Jagged Globe, Featured Expedition

EverestNews.com will feature full dispatches from Jagged Globe in Spring 2000. Jagged Globe was founded by Steve Bell. Steve has more than 20 years of mountaineering experience including winter ascents of the north faces of the Eiger and Matterhorn. He claims "Britain's first guided expedition to an 8,000m peak and was the first Briton to lead clients to the summit of Everest." He has climbed all of the continental summits and is a fully qualified UIAGM mountain guide.

Steve and Jagged Globe are known as one of the best guiding companies in the world. Some think the Best.

This year's expedition will be lead by Australian guide, Andrew Lock (having been on two previous Everest expeditions and reached the Summit of K2), supported by Tim Bird. Tim has led expeditions for Jagged Globe for many years including successful trips to Elbrus, Stok Kangri, Mera and Island Peak, Aconcagua and Gasherbrum II. A highly regarded professional instructor (MIC), Tim directs their Scottish Winter Courses, and provides their UK technical support for training and advice to all their group expeditions licensed through the Adventure Activities Licensing Authority. They are using the same Sherpa team as last year.

This is another international team, comprising:  Jack Culley (UK), Joe Wolf (USA), Jeff Magee (UK), David Spencer (UK), Curt Peterson (USA), Timothy Gregg (USA) , Paul Giorgio (USA). Joe Wolf hopes to complete his 7 Summits and to be the oldest summiter this season - he's 61 in March!

Dispatch One: This is the first report from the Jagged Globe 2000 Everest Expedition. The team members have been gathering over the last three days here in Nepal. With the exception of Andy Lock all the team is now here at the Summit Hotel in Katmandu. We've had a busy few days in preparation for tomorrow's 5am departure for Lukla and onto Base Camp. The outline programme for our trek to BC is as follows: 26-Mar Lukla to Phakdig 
27-Mar Namche
28-Mar Namche
29-Mar Khumjung
30-Mar Pangbouche
1-Apr Dingbouche
2-Apr Dingbouche
3-Apr Chukkum ri
4-Apr Rest/Spare day
5-Apr Lobuje
6-Apr Gorak Shep
7-Apr BC
Our next dispatch will not be until we get to Namche. Our love, best wishes and thanks to family, friends & sponsors who have got us to Nepal. 

Tim Bird, Deputy Leader

Dispatch Two: The third day of our trek to base camp and all is well! Today is a rest and acclimatization day in Namche (3445m). We've had a late breakfast at 8am instead of the usual 5am start on trekking days. The reason for the early starts is to try and beat the afternoon storms. Yesterday we started in blue skies and sunshine, only to arrive in a light snow storm in Namche. Today started fine but the weather is once again clouding over. The guys have been heeding my advice and taking it easy in this very important phase in the trek. Today we have visited the Everest Museum and had lunch at the Everest bakery. Now its back to the Panorama Lodge to rest, read and write a few postcards. Tough life! I hear you say, but its really important not to rush around up hear. The development in the Khumbu region is phenomenal, with tea houses and lodges being built very quickly. Even since my visit last Autumn, I can see a change in the number of lodges on route. The National Park had 25000 visitors in 1999 in comparison to around 20000 in '98. However even with all this growth I believe that this will be our last dispatch until we meet up with our sat phone and lap top at base camp on or around the 7th April. 

Tim Bird Deputy Expedition Leader

Dispatch Three: The team arrived at base camp on 7 April and is preparing to go to Camp 2 tomorrow (on 11 April).  Andrew Lock has joined the rest of the team and they have already got acquainted with the Khumbu Icefall, having made several forays into it over the last few days.  There is a temporary glitch with the email facility hence this report which was sent to the Jagged Globe office by sat-phone.  First-hand reports from the deputy leader, Tim Bird, are expected to resume on 12 April. Tom Briggs, Jagged Globe office. 

Dispatch Four: The seventh of April saw the arrival of the whole team at base camp ( BC = 5350m) This included the arrival of Andrew Lock, the Team Leader. Andrew had been delayed due to unavoidable hold ups in Antarctica, something familiar to several of the other team members! Andrew has been with us for one week now, and brings with him a great breath and depth of experience including; two previous Everest attempts and six other 8000m summits. Under Andrews competent leadership the team has prepared for and completed phase one of our acclimatisation plan. Phase one included:

1. Equipment checks and fix rope practice 

2. A short excursion into the ice fall to practice crossing the infamous ladders that span the crevasses 

3. An acclimatisation load carry to Camp 1 and return to BC (climb high and sleep low!) The team is now on its second rest day after completing this first phase, and is preparing for phase two. Tomorrow morning the 13 April we plan to leave BC at am to spend two nights at camp 1 with an acclimatisation trip to camp 2 between the nights. The BC communications systems are just coming through the normal teething problems associated with high tech equipment in adverse conditions, so we hope to keep family and friends updated on our return from phase two. The team are all safe and well and apart from small discomforts that life above 5000m brings are all focused on the stepping stones to climb the Mountain. Tim Bird Deputy Team Leader 

Dispatch Five: The Jagged Globe team is now back from its second foray onto the mountain. Most members were able to complete the load carry to the site of camp two and drop a small amount of equipment to be used later on the climb. It is with sadness that we have had to say goodbye to Curt Peterson, an expedition member from the USA who retired from the climb yesterday the 17 April due to an ankle injury. After taking advice from the base camp doctor and the expedition leadership, Curt decided that his injury would not have time to heal during the expedition. If all goes well, he should be home with his family in approximately one week from leaving BC.

The rest of the crew is now resting and recuperating in BC for three days (17 – 19) before our next and final acclimatisation climb. We plan to leave BC early on the 20 April for camp one, then two nights at Advanced Base Camp (camp two ABC) where we have a simple mess / cook tent facility at 6400m. Then onto the Lhotse face and up to camp three at 7300m, a precarious camp cut out of the ice face! This is not a camp to hang around in, and our next visit here will be on the summit attempt in May. On this trip we will spend one night at camp three, getting up early to descend to BC for breakfast at ABC / camp two. 

This last planed phase of acclimatisation will lead us into a longer period of rest at BC and most probably at lower elevations before our summit bid in May. The team is preparing for the next stage of the climb and sends love and best wishes to our family and friends. Our next report will be during the next rest at BC, on approximately the 27 April. 

Tim Bird Deputy Expedition Leader

Dispatch: The team acclimatizes at camp 2 and has a scare on the Lhotse Face. Hi again from the Jagged Globe Everest expedition base camp. In the last week we've had plenty of activity and a few exciting incidents. All expedition members and staff are well. 

On Thursday 20th April, the team was saddened to farewell one of our members, Jack Culley, who had decided to depart for home. Jack was a valued team member and we wish him an enjoyable and safe trip home. 

On the same day, the majority of the team headed up to camp 1, en route to camp 3 for an acclimatisation trip. The plan was to move on Friday to camp 2, rest for a day and then make the long climb to camp 3 for a taste of thin air. Deputy leader Tim Bird led the group to camp 1, whilst expedition leader Andrew Lock stayed in base camp to facilitate Jack's departure. 

On Friday 21st, the team trekked from camp 1 up the magnificent Western Cwm, surrounded by the towering walls of Nuptse, Lhotse and of course Everest, to establish camp 2 at the foot of Everest's steep south west face. Andrew joined the team by climbing direct from base camp to camp 2. 

An acclimatisation day at camp 2 was much appreciated by all, as were the continual hot drinks and meals served up by our Sherpa cooks, Ghombu and Ming Ma. Watching them melt chunks of ice from the surrounding seracs, one ponders the age of the liquid we are drinking. Camp 2 serves the purpose of an advance base camp and so is well stocked for prolonged stays by the expeditioners.

Easter Sunday saw the whole team, leaders, members and four Sherpas, make a 5.30am departure for the Lhotse face, the intention being to climb that day to camp 3 around 7300 meters. Strong winds and low temperatures took the fun out of the hour long journey to the base of the face. This year the Lhotse face is bare of snow and the climb to camp 3 is made over the exposed hard ice. 

Almost immediately, the mountain reminded us all of the potential dangers of climbing these big peaks. One of the team was only a short distance up the ropes when an anchor pulled and he slid over 10 meters down the ice. His fall was arrested by the snow at the base and two of our Sherpa team who were well positioned to assist. Whilst a nasty scare was the worst injury, we were faced with the need to re-fix the ropes on the lowest section of the face. 

The team returned to camp 2, to organize the rope and ice equipment for the following day. As luck would have it, the weather deteriorated that night and saw a heavy dump of snow. We decided to descend to base camp to allow the avalanche danger to pass and to rest for a couple of days in the thicker air. 

The weather remains a little fickle but the team are enjoying the base camp services of emails from home and the opportunity for a hot wash (albeit a quick one in the chill air). The team are in good health and anxious to continue the climb. Until next time, best wishes from base camp. 

Tim Bird, Deputy Expedition Leader 

Dispatch: Back up for acclimatisation at Camp 3

Hi again from Jagged Globe Everest expedition base camp. With three rest days under our belts, the team is ready to venture back up the mountain. It's been a beneficial opportunity to recover from the various minor ailments that can hamper Himalayan expeditions. Sore knees, minor snow blindness, split lips and dry cough; all typical of high altitude expeditioning. 

The rest days have not been wasted. Team members Tim G., Jeff, Paul and Joe have made preparations for the next ascent. Jeff and Paul have sharpened their crampon points for the anticipated hard ice of the Lhotse face whilst Joe took a walk down the glacier to stretch his legs and maintain the fitness. Additionally, endless games of Risk have seen Paul dishing out a few tactical lessons to willing victims. 

Back to the mountain. Whilst we are ready to go, close attention is being paid to the weather, as wind is the major obstacle at the moment. Strong winds (50 knots +) have been blowing about the higher slopes of Lhotse and encroaching down towards camp 3. Thus the clear dawns that present themselves most mornings, are not necessarily the best indicators for safe climbing. 

Weather depending, we plan to ascend directly to Camp 2 tomorrow (Friday) with a view either to ascend to camp 3 on Saturday, or to take a rest day at Camp 2 and ascend on Sunday. It is a climb of nearly 2000 meters from base camp to Camp 3, so a rest day may well be in order. Having already slept at Camp 2 for several nights, we hope to be  sufficiently acclimatized for the night's stay at Camp 3. 

If all goes to plan, this should be our final acclimatisation trip before our summit attempt. Our Sherpas still have plenty of hard work ahead of them, ferrying food, equipment and oxygen to Camp 4, in preparation for the attempt. They will accompany us to Camp 2 tomorrow but remain there after we descend from camp 3, in order to complete the carries. 

The usual afternoon cloud is rolling in over base camp as I type (about 2.30pm local time), and a few centimeters of snow will probably be with us by dinner time. The cloud has generally dispersed by the time we retire and our 4am wake up should see clear skies and chilly temperatures. Brrrr. 

Until we return, best wishes from all at base camp. 

Andrew Lock, Expedition Leader 

Andrew is a former Summitter of that smaller mountain, K2....

Dispatch:  Well its Thursday, 4th May and the Jagged Globe team are all safely back in base camp after a successful acclimatisation climb to camp 3. 

On April 28th, we set out at 5am for the climb to camp 2. The trip through the icefall is quicker each time, as we acclimatize and become more familiar with the route. Still it's no place to hang around and camp 1 is a welcome place to stop and rest for a while. 

We prefer now to climb direct to camp 2, as the energy expended in collecting and melting snow, cooking meals etc. at camp 1, is greater than pushing on to the higher camp. Our advance base Sherpa staff occupies camp 2 throughout the expedition, so it's well maintained. We took a rest day on Saturday, to recover from the one vertical kilometer climb from base. Sunday dawned fine and not too windy, so we headed off at 6am for our second attempt on the Lhotse face. The long slog up the final section of the Western Cwm saw the team spread out below the imposing ice wall. 

Once onto the Lhotse face, the ropes were found to be in good condition and the slope less threatening than rumor had predicted. The ice was hard but our crampons gripped well and we made slow but consistent progress up the face. The first members arrived about 11.30am and spent the afternoon cutting ice for the stoves and digging out buried tents. 

The thin air and cold early morning wind took its toll on the team and the final members didn't arrive until 6pm. A fairly sleepless night was endured, during which the winds strengthened until by dawn the tents were being buffeted continuously. We waited for the sun, then descended quickly to the cwm and back to camp 2. The following morning the climbers descended to base. 

Our Sherpas remained in camp 2, to await an opportunity to ferry some loads to the south col. This is where our camp 4 will be located. Having completed their load carries, the Sherpas will descend for a rest at base camp, prior to the whole team ascending for the summit attempt. 

Whilst we wait for them, the team has an opportunity to rest and regain strength for the big push. Tim B. and Joe will head down to one of the local villages to spend a couple of days in the thicker air. Paul and Tim G. prefer to remain in base camp. Andrew will also stay in base to liaise with the Sherpas and to watch the weather for the best summit opportunity. 

Sadly, Jeff has chosen to depart the expedition, as he suffered some minor frostbite to his fingers on the climb to camp 3 and with medical advice feels that the risk of serious injury would be too great if he continued the climb. The injury should heal quickly back at home and he will depart today for Kathmandu. 

The weather today is clear, though a little windy. Our Sherpas are at this minute en route to camp 4 with a load. We wish them well. It will be a few days before we can consider a summit attempt, so plenty of opportunity to catch up on sleep, reading and perhaps a little socializing with the other expeditions. 

Cheers from base camp. Andrew Lock

Dispatch 5/10/200: Summit attempt

A strong team of 4 lead by Andrew Lock, and supported by four experienced climbing Sherpas, is today in camp two on route to the South Col and a summit push planned for the 13 May. The Met Office day report for the Everest region, forecasts low summit winds during this period. 

The team will be using supplementary oxygen above camp three both to climb and sleep. Many variables can still affect the teams progress, so here at Base Camp we wish them the best of luck and we will endeavour to keep folks at home posted on their progress. 

Tim Bird, Deputy Expedition Leader 

Update 5/13/2000: The Jagged Globe team led by Andrew Lock is today moving from Camp 2 to Camp 3 in preparation for a summit attempt on the May 15. The delay from the previously mentioned summit day is due to logistics and climbing conditions on the mountain. Today (13th May) a Himalayan Guides team led by Rick Allen attempted the summit but turned back near the balcony due to extreme cold (-37) and we believe difficult snow conditions. The weather is very stable and we wish the team every success on the 15th. Tim Bird 

Status 5/21/2000:  As time draws short for our attempt on this mountain, Paul and Andrew have headed up today for their final summit attempt. The weather forecast indicates an opportunity on May 23rd, so that will be their aim. Today they have gone to camp 2 and weather permitting, they will continue their ascent to arrive at camp 4 on the afternoon of the 22nd.They will be accompanied on the attempt by their Sherpa team of Nima Ghombu and Tsillen. 

EverestNews.com will feature full dispatches from Jagged Globe in Spring 2000. Jagged Globe was founded by Steve Bell. Steve has more than 20 years of mountaineering experience including winter ascents of the north faces of the Eiger and Matterhorn. He claims "Britain's first guided expedition to an 8,000m peak and was the first Briton to lead clients to the summit of Everest." He has climbed all of the continental summits and is a fully qualified UIAGM mountain guide. Steve and Jagged Globe are known as one of the best guiding companies in the world. Some think the Best.

This year's expedition will be lead by Australian guide, Andrew Lock (having been on two previous Everest expeditions and reached the Summit of K2), supported by Tim Bird. Tim has led expeditions for Jagged Globe for many years including successful trips to Elbrus, Stok Kangri, Mera and Island Peak, Aconcagua and Gasherbrum II. A highly regarded professional instructor (MIC), Tim directs their Scottish Winter Courses, and provides their UK technical support for training and advice to all their group expeditions licensed through the Adventure Activities Licensing Authority. They are using the same Sherpa team as last year.

This is another international team, comprising:  Jack Culley (UK), Joe Wolf (USA), Jeff Magee (UK), David Spencer (UK), Curt Peterson (USA), Timothy Gregg (USA) , Paul Giorgio (USA). Joe Wolf hopes to complete his 7 Summits and to be the oldest summiter this season - he's 61 in March!

Update ! They did it! 

SUCCESS! 25-May-00 

Hi all, just down to Base Camp and letting you know that Andrew Lock, Paul Giorgio and Nima Ghombu reached the summit of Mt Everest at 6.30am on 24 May. All have just reached Base Camp and are going to have a bite to eat and a good wash and will then give a full report of the climb. Everyone is in good health and extremely happy!! cheers A.L. 

The summit story 25-May-00 Hi again from Jagged Globe BC, where the summiteers are rejoicing. 

After setting out on our last attempt with the intention of summiting on the 23rd, we found that we were delayed by bad weather for one day. We stayed at camp 2 for the day before heading up to camp 3 on the 22nd and camp 4 on the 23rd. Reclimbing the mountain so soon after our previous attempt was not as exhausting as expected and we felt strong for the summit push.

One of our sherpas had left us the night before the attempt, due to a sick child in Kathmandu, so we had only Nima Ghombu with us. Nima is without doubt the strongest of our Sherpa staff. 

We set out for the summit at 10pm, and quickly found ourselves on the large face leading up to the 'balcony' . On the way, we passed a couple of other teams making their attempt and we then had the mountain to ourselves. We climbed quickly in a fairly stiff breeze, with temperatures around -25C. Reaching the balcony at 2.30am, we changed oxygen bottles and continued upwards towards our previous high point of the south summit. This we reached in the dawn light and we again changed oxygen bottles to finish the climb. Departing the south summit at 5am, we traversed the delicate ridge, climbing the Hillary step on the way. The step proved less difficult than expected but by this time the winds had increased severely and we had to haul on the fixed ropes which were flying horizontally above China. 

Once over the step, we had some further ridge traversing before emerging onto easier ground towards the top and a final gentle slope that took us to the summit at 6.30am. Andrew arrived first, with Paul and Nima Ghombu all on the summit by 6.45am. 

Whilst another success for Jagged Globe, this was a particularly rewarding achievement for the three, who just 9 days earlier had been stopped at the south summit. Having descended all the way to Basecamp where they rested for just 2 days prior to reclimbing the entire mountain, all three are justifiably ecstatic at their success. 

The ascent has particular significance for each of the climbers: For Andrew, it is his seventh 8000 meter summit, having already climbed K2, Nanga Parbat, Broad Peak, Hidden Peak, Gasherbrum 2 and Dhaulagiri. He has now climbed more '8000ers' than any other Australian. For Paul, this was his first 8000er and to have virtually climbed the entire mountain twice in the one expedition is a fantastic achievement. For Nima Ghombu, this is his 6th ascent of Mt Everest, a phenomenal success. 

The climbers plan to depart Basecamp tomorrow for Kathmandu, hoping to arrive on 29 May. A final update will be sent from there. 

Best regards from Basecamp. A.L. 

http://www.jagged-globe.co.uk/

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