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 Hans Kammerlander retired, but why ?

Back in August 2001: Italian climber Hans Kammerlander, back from the successful expedition to K2, will never more climb Himalayan tops: "I will not go for Manaslu, the last one to complete my 14 eight thousands" he announced today in a press meeting in his hometown Bolzano.

"Too many tragedies I have lived on Manaslu, I will not face my bad dreams". On Manaslu, during his 1991 expedition, his friends and mates Karl Grossrubatscher and Friedl Mutschlechner died in the attempt to summit.

"I can go on living with 13 tops instead of 14. There are so many beautiful mountains in the world I can climb now. Not Manaslu". During the press meeting, Kammerlander (44 years old) explained details of his last expedition: " Since the first moment in Pakistan - he said - after two attempts in the recent seasons, I had decided this was the last attack". Italian climber took his skis with him, just like on Everest in 1996. He wanted to be the first to ski down from the top to base camp. He gave up some 400 meters below the top, at elevation 8611: "The wall was a stiff 60 degrees, it would had been like skiing on a bell tower roof" he said yesterday. "When I saw a Korean climber falling down the wall, passing just few meters away from me, I took my skis off". But Kammerlander still thinks it is possible to do it: "Somebody will do it, but he'll need a lot of ability and a whole of luck". This will not be himself, he told: "I'm 44, to old to try again, and I leave this dream to young people". Kammerlander however, hopes this will be a fair and ethic success: "Skiing down K2 must be done in a honest way, as I always tried to behave. I heard of people who reached Everest top with plenty of oxygen and many Sherpas, lately. I heard Sherpas carried skis for them as well. This means corrupting the highest top of the world to an easy seven thousand peak" he said. from: Gigi Zoppello, journalist, Trento (Italy)

Actually Hans has only summitted the Central Summit of Shishapangma according to our records, so to finish the Quest for the 14 8000 meter peaks, he would need to go back to Shishapangma too. 

However, Hans is strong enough to do it, without question, so why not ?

What happened on Manaslu? Some of you probably recall, others probably not.... Well here is the short story, from what we have found out: Hans was leading a 12 person Italian-German Expedition attempting the Northeast face of Manaslu. Hans, Karl Grossrubatscher, and Friedl Mutschlechner left camp 2 on May 10, 1991 for the summit going strong, but with deep snow Hans reached 7500 meters and turned around. While descending back to camp Hans found Karl dead near camp 2. Friedl and Hans continued to descend from camp 2, suddenly a thunder storm overcame them and Friedo was killed by lightning just above camp 1.

So now you know the rest of the story. Hans is continuing to climb and guide, we will see if he changes his mind....

For the Czech Interview with Hans Kammerlander (before his Summit on K2 this year, see here. 

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